Tagged: John Wayne Gacy

Murder in the Summertime

Now that we are in deep into Fall and past Spooky Season, based on crime statistics, we’re relatively safe from getting murdered. 

Enjoy your PSL and not getting murdered.

Until about May, the only thing we really have to worry about is offending relatives during the Holidays.

It doesn’t take a criminal researcher to conclude that more people out and about with an increase of public events and activities leads to more crime. Obviously there will be more crime in New York City than the bustling metropolis of Pleasureville, Kentucky. This subject has been debated for years and they have proven the theory correct.

It is a balmy 29 degrees where I am. It’s safe to say that there is not a lot going on as most people are probably warm and cozy in their houses slack-jawed and watching 90 Day Fiancé and not out and about. At least that’s what I’m doing right now. 

Me right now.

So, let’s reminisce about sweaty days past with some depressing and true crime stats.

When the temperature rises so does the murder rate. According to the New York Times, the rate of shootings doubled in Chicago, Milwaukee and Detroit on hot days versus cold. While those cities are located in colder climates, the trend still applies to warmer climates such as Atlanta and Orlando.

While the increase of bodies in the morgue in the summer applies to all months, there is one in particular that seems to be particularly bloody… August. 

Ed Kemper murdered his grandparents in August.

John Wayne Gacy killed two victims back to back in August 1976.

Richard Ramirez murdered three victims on August 6,8,18,24 in 1985 and was captured on August 30.

Jeffrey Dahmer murdered his last three victims a month earlier in July which coincides with the theory of increased homicides in colder cities in warmer months. Note: Dahmer was active in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

One of the most disturbing trends found in the study of increased crime in the warmer months is that family annihilators (those who murder their families and often themselves) are most likely to commit their crimes on a Sunday in August. 

This seems like an obscure and almost bogus fact. However, it makes perfect sense when you look closer.

Sunday is often the day when fathers are with their children. In divorced families, Sunday is the more often than not the day that children are taken back to their mother after spending time with their fathers. In many cases of family annihilators, fathers will murder children as a way to hurt their mother or get revenge for someway she wronged him. In turn, male family annihilators then murder the mother to eliminate a witness.

Not only does the summer heat make criminals all murder happy, the season can also increase depression.

Researchers have found a possible link between individuals likely to commit violence and depression. This is not to saythat everyone with depression is violent! A Murder Most Foul is a pro mental health blog. Yours truly suffers from adult ADD and PMDD and I take medicine for both. Dn’t @ me on Twitter or send me hate mail.

Anyway, I hope you’ve enjoyed these depressing and true crime facts that I’ve tried to make entertaining. Stay warm and stay inside next August.

Murderabilia, or “why the hell is that in your house?”

Owning something collected from a crime scene or that was once owned by a famous murderer is the ultimate way to:

1. Keep your family and neighborhood children away from your house

2. Creep out your friends

3. Not get a second date

OR maybe find cool friends and the love of your life. Dean Martin was wrong, you are somebody when someone doesn’t love you, even if you have Ted Bundy’s Christmas card on your fridge.

Murderabilia is exactly what it sounds like- memorabilia collected from crime scenes and from the homes of murderers, personal effects, and artwork.

By far the famous pieces of murderabilia are the notorious Pogo the Clown paintings by everyone’s favorite KFC lovin’ serial killer, John Wayne Gacy.

 

 

Murderabilia is taking both true crime and trash vs. treasure to the extreme. While legal, the buying and selling of these items go hand in hand with the Son of Sam Law, which prohibits criminals from profiting from their crimes such as selling stories to journalists and publishers.

Instead, these macabre collectibles are sold through dealer sites. eBay banned the sale of such items in 2001. The concept alone sounds like something only the most depraved can access via the dark web. Surprisingly (or not), a Google search will lead the curious to these sites. eBay banned the sale of such items in 2001. The concept alone sounds like something only the most depraved can access via the dark web. Surprisingly (or not), a Google search will lead the curious to these sites.

To collectors, murderabilia is owning a piece of history. While collecting these oddities borders on illicit and would raise some eyebrows in conversation, the sale of these items isn’t about making money for the sellers. Many of these sites will donate to victims and their families. 

The concept is interesting and intriguing. However, as someone who runs a true crime blog, collecting these items is taking it too far and borders on serial/mass murder glorification and sympathizing (more on that later). These items belong in a museum, not in the creepiest living room display case of all time.

You’re probably better off still hoarding Beanie Babies.

 

 

Typologies of Serial Killers

The typology of a serial killer is exactly what you think it is. In order to track them, investigators must first have an understanding of how (and later why) they operate.

While there are several different types of serial killers and offenders, which I will get into in a later post, the most basic typology and the most widely used by investigators is the Holmes Typology. This is also known as the Organized/Disorganized Dichotomy and is also attributed to famed FBI Profiler Roy Hazelwood. Once the basic typology is documented, a more detailed subcategory can be assigned.

The HT classifies serial killers into 2 groups:

Organized and Disorganized

Organized serial killers live seemingly stable, normal lives. They are gainfully and skillfully employed, socially aware, highly intelligent, and often have families and regular friendships. These characteristics also spill over into how they commit their crimes. Organized killers plan their crimes well in advance, sometimes years.

They have a specific type of victim such as sex workers or individuals with a certain physical trait. These individuals are more likely to restrain victims, dispose of bodies in a discreet location, and remove a weapon from the crime scene. Their crimes are also usually not committed where they dispose of bodies, but are more likely to move bodies.

Since they are more socially skilled than their disorganized counterpart, these killers often have a social interaction with their victims. Little evidence is left behind at murders committed by organized killers.

Examples include: BTK, John Wayne Gacy

john-wayne-gacy-killer-clown

Any time I can post a picture of a creepy clown, I’m down. Rhyme intended. Pogo no longer does parties. Image via.

Disorganized serial killers tend to be drifters with a more spontaneous lifestyle. They are also more likely to commit other crimes along with murder, including drug use and necrophilia. Below average intelligence is a characteristic. They often suffer from some sort of sexual dysfunction and severe mental illness, which are the root causes of their crimes. Victims are random and usually do not fit a certain demographic or description. Disorganized killers will leave evidence behind at crime scenes, including blood, fingerprints, and the murder weapon. Crime scene locations are in close proximity to the killer and murders are committed at the location where the victim is found, hence the evidence left at the crime scene.

Examples include: Ottis Toole, Richard Chase a.k.a The Vampire of Sacramento. 

FYI, if you never want to sleep again, do a search for Richard Chase. Nighty, nighty! 

Then, of course, there’s Ted Bundy. You know you can’t mention serial killers without his name coming up. Teddy boy is actually a mixture of both typologies, even though he tends to lean towards organized more so than disorganized. However, based on his famous Florida murder spree in 1978, Bundy crossed over into disorganized territory with the random killings. Bundy’s affinity for necrophilia also puts him into the disorganized category.

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 Probably the creepiest murder ever because he looks like a hipster after a shift at the indie coffee shop and not a serial killer. Image via.

Sources:

http://murderpedia.org/male.B/b1/bundy-ted.htm

http://www.leotrainer.com/serialtypology.pdf

http://murders.ru/Classific.pdf